ArtAlive

From April 24 to April 26, the San Diego Museum of Art will be transformed into a vision of art and flowers as more than 100 floral designers bring the Museum's renowned Permanent Collection to life during the 34th annual Art Alive fundraiser. In addition to the floral exhibition and other special events, fashion designer, San Diego native, and FIDM Graduate Paul Hernandez will create one-of-a-kind, draped dress forms inspired by four works from the Museum’s Permanent Collection. 

This year’s floral exhibition will be open from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Friday, April 24 through Sunday, April 26. General admission is free for members, $20 for nonmembers, and free for children age 6 and under. In addition to viewing the annual floral exhibition during Museum hours, Art Alive 2015 offers three full days of events, activities, and celebrations. 

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Paul Hernandez to Create Dress Forms Inspired by Works From San Diego Museum of Art

From April 24 to April 26, the San Diego Museum of Art will be transformed into a vision of art and flowers as more than 100 floral designers bring the...

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Brook

Mixed Business invites you to meet Textile Design Graduate Brook Peridgon at Saturday's Meet the Maker Event in Los Angeles. The artist and textile designer will be on hand from 2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. and showcasing two textile collections. 

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Meet Textile Designer Brook Perdigon On Saturday, April 25 in Los Angeles

Mixed Business invites you to meet Textile Design Graduate Brook Peridgon at Saturday's Meet the Maker Event in Los Angeles. The artist and textile designer will be on hand from...

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Pasadena

Interior Design Graduates Casey Mason and Ruben Marquez of Jennifer Bevan Interiors designed the library and an adjoining bath for this year's Pasadena Showcase House. "We used a combination of Dunn Edwards Muslin, Reclaimed Wood, and Barnwood Gray to create over-scaled Greek key panels as a play on wainscoting and to give the space a sense of history. There were bookcases and a faux fireplace on the south wall that were not original to the home, so we removed them to enhance the square footage of the library and allow us to create an intimate seating area," explains Casey. "The Kravet fabrics that we chose for the furniture and drapery are a perfect mix of textures and we fell in love with the abstract art piece over the sofa by Bryan Ricci, a local LA artist, and we felt that it perfectly juxtaposes the traditional elements in the room."

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The adjoining bathroom takes cues from a gentleman’s suit, starting with a Walker Zanger mosaic that seamlessly combines marble and porcelain. "The textured wall covering by Dillard Pierce is the perfect marriage of drama and dimension," she adds. "The gorgeous faucet, sink, and vanity legs from Sherle Wagner fell in line with the idea of a gentleman’s area, since stately architecture motivated the design of the fittings. The modern, cubic Christopher Guy mirror is definitely meant to be a statement piece. Polished nickel lighting add a flawless finish, creating a handsome-looking space."

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The 2015 Pasadena Showcase House of Design is open through May 17, 2015. Tickets are available for purchase here

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Interior Design Grads Create Rooms for 2015 Pasadena Showcase House

Interior Design Graduates Casey Mason and Ruben Marquez of Jennifer Bevan Interiors designed the library and an adjoining bath for this year's Pasadena Showcase House. "We used a combination of...

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Marisol

Fashion Knitwear Design Graduate Marisol Aguirre has a new job at L.A.-based Alternative Apparel as a Technical Designer in the men's department. After finishing her degree in 2007, she worked for more than four years at Forever 21, in the girls department, and freelanced for Multee. We recently chatted with Marisol to learn more about her current job and future goals. 

What are your responsibilities at Alternative Apparel? I’m responsible for all fits, from development to pre-production. My job is to ensure each garment's fit represents the aesthetic view of the company. I fit once a week on a live model and submit fit comments to vendors in a timely manner to ensure all deadlines are met. I also, must keep track of all samples and maintain all logs that pertain to my styles. Being organized and having the ability to communicate efficiently are a must in my position as I must ensure our vendors received sufficient and correct information to provide us with quality production.

How did FIDM help prepare you for your career? FIDM prepared me for my career by providing courses that I continue to use in my current job. One of my favorite classes was, Stitch, Color and Surface Design with Instructor Robin Wagner. We learned the particulars of color and texture created by an assortment of stitches. I’m thankful and grateful to Robin Wagner and Anne Bennion for providing me with knowledge and support that I have utilize throughout my career.

What are your ultimate career goals? I enjoy and appreciate the responsibilities that come with being a Technical Designer. However, now that I’m a mother to a baby boy, my goal to one day teach children art and knit has resurfaced. My background as a playground worker/tutor at an afterschool program called LA’s BEST (which I worked for in my twenties as I attended FIDM) would come in handy. But at this point in my life my personal goals are to be the best mother and wife. And as for my career goal, it is to be the best Technical Designer I can possibly be.

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Fashion Knitwear Design Grad is a Technical Designer at Alternative Apparel (Interview)

Fashion Knitwear Design Graduate Marisol Aguirre has a new job at L.A.-based Alternative Apparel as a Technical Designer in the men's department. After finishing her degree in 2007, she worked...

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Student Life

IMPD Student Karoline Korpor Wins Hank Pola Scholarship

Members of L.A.'s fashion community celebrated FIDM International Manufacturing & Product Development Student Karoline Korpor (pictured with Ilse Metchek), who recently received the Hank Pola Scholarship. Named in honor of...

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This month the FIDM Library reports on ecological advances in making leather as more fashion and interior design companies seek out sustainable and organic alternatives.

Conventional leather processing involves the use of chrome and heavy metals—methods that create soft, pliable hides at the expense of the environment. Also, the leather industry uses the by-products of the meat industry for their skins. With Eco-friendly leather the cows are raised humanely in open pastures. The tanning process uses bio-degradable materials such as bark and plant tannins, and is free of heavy metals. 

Lab Grown Leather

Modern Meadow is a company working on alternate methods for producing leather. Their tissue-engineering technique called "biofabrication" follows the same principle as cultured products such as beer or yogurt to brew a quality leather from bovine skin cells obtained from biopsies that do not harm the animals. It currently takes the company 6 weeks to make a square foot of fully finished leather. Conventional methods take two to three years to obtain, care for, and feed an animal. Modern Meadow's goal is to eventually meet the global demand for leather goods without using water, chemicals. or animals.

by Cynthia Aaron, FIDM Library

The Latest Trends

From the FIDM Library: Textiles & Materials Quarterly, Eco Leather

This month the FIDM Library reports on ecological advances in making leather as more fashion and interior design companies seek out sustainable and organic alternatives. Conventional leather processing involves the...

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